Think • Stimulate • Bridge

OCP Policy Center’s blog is an open debate and exchange platform where experts share comments, reviews, analyses, charts, opinions and facts related to the Think Tank’s programs and research topics.


Atlantic Dialogues Emerging Leaders, Day One

OCP Policy Center | Posted : December 11, 2017

The new cohort of Atlantic Dialogues Emerging Leaders has arrived in Marrakech ! 50 young professionals aged between 23 and 35 and and carrying 25 different nationalities are following workshops. In the program today : « Technological changes, skills and jobs of tomorrow », with The Nigerian scientist Ade Mabogunje, a design thinking specialist from Stanford University (USA) and Martine Kappel, Danish expert on « self-realization » and founder of True North Leadership in Kenya.

Atlantic Dialogues Emerging Leaders, première journée

OCP Policy Center | Posted : December 11, 2017

La nouvelle cohorte des Atlantic Dialogues Emerging Leaders a convergé le 10 décembre à Marrakech, pour faire connaissance et suivre un programme spécial de deux jours, avant le début de la conférence de haut niveau Atlantic Dialogues (13-15 décembre).

African migration : why the story has to be told in another way

OCP Policy Center | Posted : December 07, 2017

The CNN report broadcasted on November 14th on a sale of African migrants as slaves in Lybia has caused a wave of shock and protest. More than ever, the African migration, often perceived as a scourge, is on the agenda. The Atlantic Dialogues will discuss it in another way. Why ? Because the cold analysis of facts and figures shows that the African clandestine migration to Europe, far from an invasion, may well be an opportunity... 

Jobs, Industrialization, and Globalization

Hinh T. Dinh | Posted : November 28, 2017

After many decades of expansion, incomes and standards of living have never been better in many parts of the world. Yet, global trade and the prospects of growth still seem uncertain, and protectionism seems to be on the rise. In developed countries, there is anxiety over the loss of the manufacturing jobs that once absorbed a large share of the labor force and created a middle class that formed the core of democracy. Most middle-income countries have not yet been able to make the transition to the high-income group despite the decades of growth. Progress among low-income countries, particularly the sub-Saharan African countries, in achieving productivity growth and structural change—key features of economic development—has not been encouraging, and reverse structural transformation or deindustrialization has occurred in some countries.

The Education Puzzle

Thomas Awazu Pereira da Silva | Posted : October 04, 2017

Is Education in crisis worldwide? It surely is a fundamental issue of national and international development for Morocco’s policy makers. Recent reforms point to a key moment and momentum builder in public policy and policy implementation for the Kingdom. Policy makers agree that Education touches on fundamental themes of development economics as well as cognitive growth and ethics. It is behind human capital accumulation, and thus productivity and economic growth benefits from international trade and cooperation, facilitates the absorption of new technologies and therefore influences how our lives and working processes evolve. It also relates to a moral concern to provide opportunities for all individuals and social improvement. Education illustrates the challenges to link progress in theoretical development economics to practical policy design and operationalization. Naturally, working on Education reform involves: (i) analytical work testing the appropriate models with the best data; (ii) project or policy design using the previous results; (iii) implementation of the most effective project or policy; and (iv) evaluation of outcomes. But Education is more: it also has (v) an ethical dimension, providing quantity and quality educational opportunities for all. In sum, Education - as part of poverty and inequality reduction strategies - needs to be effective and socially inclusive. It is rarely a one-size-fits-all, which is why its projects and policies need to be designed by assessing local conditions, collaborating with communities and always understanding issues from different cultural standpoints. In some instances, a common “blueprint” or a “good recipe” can be retained and adapted to local circumstances. For example, in many developing countries, the objective is to increase universal coverage in primary and secondary education while reducing poverty. However, as noticed in both Morocco, middle-income countries, and industrialized economies, this widespread enrollment strategy is now putting tremendous pressures on labor markets that show too little absorptive capacity.

The Metamorphosis of Financial Globalization

Otaviano Canuto | Posted : September 15, 2017

After a strong rising tide starting in the 1990s, financial globalization seems to have reached a plateau since the global financial crisis. However, that apparent stability has taken place along a deep reshaping of cross-border financial flows, featuring de-banking and an increasing weight of non-banking financial cross-border transactions. Sources of potential instability and long-term funding challenges have morphed accordingly.     

How Did Cuba Make It Online ?

Otaviano Canuto , Samuel George | Posted : August 28, 2017

Dual transitions are under way in Cuba. The island is slowly opening its economy, and a new crop of younger political leaders, potentially more open to democratic norms, waits in the wings. A third transition, the rise of digital access, is also in an early stage. But it is this third transition that arguably has the most momentum and could significantly accelerate the first two.

Does Brazil’s Sector Structure Explain Its Productivity Anemia?

Otaviano Canuto , Fernanda De Negri | Posted : June 20, 2017

Brazil’s labor and total-factor productivity (TFP) have featured anemic increases in the last decades (Canuto, 2016). As we illustrate here, contrary to common view, sector structures of the Brazilian GDP and employment cannot be singled out as major determinants of productivity performance. Horizontal, cross-sector factors hampering productivity increases seem to carry more weight.