Think • Stimulate • Bridge

Add to Calendar 19/06/2017 09:30 19/06/2017 17:00 Africa/Casablanca Presentation - Call for Papers - Stability and Security in Africa : The Role of Hard and Soft Power  Al Akhawayn University, Ifrane Defining power is complex and ambiguous but understanding its elements and implications on national and foreign policies remains central to the study of international relations. Both ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ powers are employed to pursue political and strategic goals through military, economic, diplomatic and others ways of conquering hearts and minds, to... Al Akhawayn University, Ifrane OCP Policy Center contact@ocppc.ma false DD/MM/YYYY

Presentation - Call for Papers - Stability and Security in Africa : The Role of Hard and Soft Power

 Al Akhawayn University, Ifrane

Defining power is complex and ambiguous but understanding its elements and implications on national and foreign policies remains central to the study of international relations. Both ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ powers are employed to pursue political and strategic goals through military, economic, diplomatic and others ways of conquering hearts and minds, to create convincing incentives and exercise influence.

Introduced in 1990, the notion of soft power refers to a country’s ability to spread its influence and effectively persuade without the use of coercion and traditional force. However, while on the aftermath of the Cold War this concept exclusively referred to the cultural and economic force of persuasion of the United States in the international scene, currently, the use of soft power is no longer specific to US foreign diplomacy. In fact, emerging powers such as China and India are also using their soft power resources including investments, foreign aid and cultural products to bring forward their national interests and strategic goals abroad.

The use of military, economic or diplomatic tools to leverage diplomatic efforts continues to represent a perennial issue in the field of international relations. The dichotomy between hard and soft power has also been revisited and questioned as some argue that a “grey” area exists where both means are used by states to defend in their interest. The growth of violent extremism and the challenge this represents to the existing international order has also called for an inclusive and comprehensive approach that brings together hard and soft power tools. These mechanisms have been increasingly taken into account within the African continent, where policy makers do not only count on the effect traditional power can have in ending crises and conflicts.

The promotion of good governance practices, stronger economic cooperation and the availability of alternative narratives to the extremist discourse combined with relevant diplomatic tools to promote social justice and equality, quality education, better infrastructure, social empowerment and fair job opportunities for the youth is often going hand in hand with military means in order to find sustainable and effective solutions to security threats and conflicts. In addition, food also, has the potential to become a dominant political issue worldwide and mostly in Africa where the population is set to double by 2050.

The OCP Policy Center in partnership with Al Akhawayn University are organizing a seminar during which they invite the selected participants to the call for paper on “Stability and Security in Africa: the Role of Hard and Soft Power” to present the content of their research papers. The seminar will allow participants to discuss the structure and outcome of their research with the members of the scientific committee and the audience ahead of the final selection round.

More information

For more information about this seminar, please send your questions to the following email address: sara.mokaddem@ocppc.ma

Agenda

09:30 – 10:00

Opening Remarks

- Nizar Messari, Dean, Al Akhawayn University
- Karim El Aynaoui, Managing Director, OCP Policy Center

10:00 – 10:30

Keynote Speech: "Soft Power and Traditional African Conflict Management"

William I. Zartman, Professor Emeritus, The Johns Hopkins University-SAIS and former President, the Tangier American Institute for Moroccan studies

10:30    – 11:30

Session 1: Security Approach assessment in North Africa - strategic and human challenges

Chair:

Tbd 

Author(s) of Paper:

 Badr Dehbi, Mohamed V University, Morocco

"R2P et droits de l’homme en Afrique/ Cas de la Libye et du Mali" 

 Brahim Saidy, Dept of International Affairs, Qatar University

"Security Sector Reform in Maghreb: finding a realistic approach"

11:30 – 11:45

Coffee Break

11:45 – 13:00

Session 2: Case studies – A conceptual analysis of resolution mechanisms for intrastate insurgencies and terrorist threat

Chair:

Tbd

Author(s) of Paper

Catherine Bartenge, Institute for Development Studies, University of Nairobi, Kenya

"At a crossroads: South Sudan’s elusive conflict resolution strategy"  

Bruno Mve Ebang, Omar Bongo University, Gabon

"Le Smart Power des petits états Africains dans la résolution des conflits"

 John Omale, Dept of Sociology, Federal University, Wukari, Nigeria

"The Role of Hard and Soft Powers in counter-insurgency in Nigeria: a critical discourse analysis"

14:15 – 15:15

Session 3: Regional organizations and the development of collective security systems in Africa

Chair:

Tbd

Author(s) of Paper

Sergio Aguilar, State University of São Paulo (UNESP), Brazil

"Regional Conflict System in Africa: an Option for Analysis”

Abdelhamid Bakkali, Université Mohamed V – Souissi, Morocco

"Sécurité collective en Afrique : Appropriation de la reflexion stratégique"

15:15 – 15:30

Coffee Break

15:30 – 16:45

Session 4: Rising Powers and the African Security Landscape

Chair:

Tbd

Author(s) of Paper

Larbi Ait Oumghar, Université Mohamed V – Souissi, Morocco

"Impact de la puissance douce dans les pays émergents ‘BRICS’ sur leur commerce extérieur" 

Mohamed Ouhemmou, Hassan II University, Morocco

 “Manufacturing Sympathy: Education, Soft Power, and Moroccan diplomacy in West Africa"

Mounia Slighoua, Toulouse 1-École doctorale Sciences juridiques et politiques, Morocco

"The BRICS and Soft Power tools in Africa"

 

Download Agenda

Keep me informed
Add to Calendar 12/09/2017 09:00 12/09/2017 17:00 Africa/Casablanca Africa Economic Summit Morocco. The Peterson Institute and OCP Policy Center are co-organizing the first edition of the Africa Economic Summit on September 12th, 2017 in Morocco. Morocco OCP Policy Center contact@ocppc.ma false DD/MM/YYYY

Africa Economic Summit

Morocco.

The Peterson Institute and OCP Policy Center are co-organizing the first edition of the Africa Economic Summit on September 12th, 2017 in Morocco.

This unprecedented initiative in the African continent will be a yearly convening of prominent economists, central and investment bankers and economic policy researchers and practitioners. The objective will be to create a continental platform for economic experts in Africa to contribute in an economic debate and also discuss the world economy in an informal setting with counterparts from the rest of the world.

The participants will cover issues related to macroeconomic and fiscal policies as well as structural reforms, such as industrial policies, in the context of spurring long-term development.

 

Keep me informed
Add to Calendar 18/04/2017 15:00 18/04/2017 18:00 Africa/Casablanca Présentation du livre Equilibres Externes, Compétitivité et Processus de Transformation Structurelle de l’Economie Marocaine Centre Links, Université Hassan II - Casablanca Le centre Links de l’université Hassan II - Casablanca, le Laboratoire d’Economie Appliquée de la faculté des sciences juridiques, économiques et sociales de Rabat-Agdal, la Commission économique pour l'Afrique des Nations Unies et OCP Policy Center organisent le 18 avril 2017, de 15h00 à 18h00 dans les locaux du centre Links de la ... Centre Links, Université Hassan II - Casablanca OCP Policy Center contact@ocppc.ma false DD/MM/YYYY

Présentation du livre Equilibres Externes, Compétitivité et Processus de Transformation Structurelle de l’Economie Marocaine

Centre Links, Université Hassan II - Casablanca

Le centre Links de l’université Hassan II - Casablanca, le Laboratoire d’Economie Appliquée de la faculté des sciences juridiques, économiques et sociales de Rabat-Agdal, la Commission économique pour l'Afrique des Nations Unies et OCP Policy Center organisent le 18 avril 2017, de 15h00 à 18h00 dans les locaux du centre Links de la faculté des sciences juridiques, économiques et sociales de Casablanca, un séminaire pour présenter l’ouvrage intitulé «Equilibres Externes, Compétitivité et Processus de Transformation Structurelle de l’Economie Marocaine».

Cet ouvrage se propose d’apporter quelques éléments d’appui supplémentaires aux policy-makers pour une meilleure identification des défaillances des marchés au Maroc et une mise en place d’une stratégie de diversification et une politique industrielle efficientes, sans toutefois tomber dans la situation inverse où une stratégie mal définie et des outils mal choisis peuvent se traduire par une défaillance des politiques publiques.

pour répondre à ces questionnements, ce livre regroupe les meilleurs articles de recherche qui ont été sélectionnés suite à un appel à communication, lancé en début d’année, et, présentés lors d’un colloque organisé le 25 Mai 2016 dernier à Rabat. L’appréhension des difficultés qu’éprouve l’économie marocaine est approchée dans ces articles par l’examen d’une multitude de facteurs, notamment, l’insuffisance du dynamisme des exportations et la faible sophistication du secteur industriel, des IDE avec de faibles effets d’entrainement sur les capacités nationales, en plus de certains aspects liés à la relation entre la politique macroéconomique et la compétitivité, en particulier la politique de change.

Le séminaire se déroulera selon le programme préliminaire suivant :

Agenda

 

14:30 – 15:00

Réception

15:00 – 15:40

Ouverture

- Mohamed BERRADA, Professeur et Président du centre Links, Faculté des Sciences Juridiques, Economiques et Sociales (FSJES), Université Hassan II - Casablanca

- Lahcen OULHAJ – Responsable du Laboratoire d’Economie Appliquée de la Faculté des Sciences Juridiques, Economiques et Sociales (FSJES/LEA) Agdal – Université Mohammed V de Rabat

- Tayeb GHAZI, Chercheur en économie, OCP Policy Center

15:40 – 17:00

Présentation du livre : Equilibres externes, compétitivité et processus de transformation structurelle de l’économie Marocaine

Modérateur : Idriss EL ABBASSI, Enseignant chercheur en économie, FSJES/LEA Agdal – Université Mohammed V de Rabat

- Partie 1 : Commerce extérieur et transformation structurelle de l’économie marocaine
Hicham BADDI, Enseignant chercheur en économie, FSJES/LEA Agdal - Université Mohammed V de Rabat

- Partie 2 : Effets des IDE sur les structures de l’économie marocaine
Redouane BACHAR, Enseignant chercheur en économie, FSJES/LEA Agdal – Université Mohammed V de Rabat

- Partie 3 : Désalignement du taux de change et compétitivité
Hind LEBDAOUI, Professeur de Finance & Economie, Université Al Akhawayn - Ifran

17:05 – 17:50

Débat public

17:50

Clôture

 

Télécharger le programme

Keep me informed
Add to Calendar 17/04/2017 16:45 17/04/2017 18:30 Africa/Casablanca Six Years After: Towards a New Social Contract /*An Economic Debate Focused on the World Bank’s new Middle East and North Africa Economic Monitor “Regional Prospects and the Economics of Post-Conflict Reconstruction”*/ By invitation, Rabat The World Bank in partnership with the OCP Policy Center announces the launch of the latest edition of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) Economic Monitor in Rabat, Morocco on April 1... OCP Policy Center, Rabat OCP Policy Center contact@ocppc.ma false DD/MM/YYYY

Six Years After: Towards a New Social Contract

An Economic Debate Focused on the World Bank’s new Middle East and North Africa Economic Monitor “Regional Prospects and the Economics of Post-Conflict Reconstruction”

By invitation, Rabat

The World Bank in partnership with the OCP Policy Center announces the launch of the latest edition of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) Economic Monitor in Rabat, Morocco on April 17, 2017. The report presents the short-term, macroeconomic outlook and economic challenges facing countries in the region. The current outlook has shifted from “cautiously pessimistic” to “cautiously optimistic” as, despite ongoing conflict and instability, the report identifies positive trends such as economic reforms and the stabilization of oil prices that if sustained will lead to higher growth. The latest edition also has a special section on the economics of post-conflict reconstruction. Along with providing an assessment of the economic costs of the conflicts in Libya, Syria and Yemen, the report outlines principles for a reconstruction effort focused not only on replacing infrastructure but on strengthening inclusive institutions.

The conference will consist of two panels; which will be livestreamed in English, French and Arabic on the World Bank and OCP Policy Center websites, and will be broadcast on F24 Arabic on Friday, April 21st, at 4:10 pm Paris time. The panels will be held in Arabic, and translated into French and English.

Panel I: 6 years after the Arab Spring: The Economic Situation in MENA and the Prospects for Growth and Reform

The economies of the MENA region were all – directly or indirectly – impacted by a multitude of factors during the last 6 years: war, violence, political instability and low oil prices. How did all these factors impact economic activity in the region as a whole? How did Arab Spring oil-importing countries (Egypt + Tunisia) perform during this period? Is their economic situation better/worse than before? How did neighboring oil-importing countries react to the changes in the region and how did they perform (example of Morocco)? And how did lower oil prices impact the economic performance of oil exporting countries (GCC + Libya and Algeria)? In view of recent developments, many MENA countries have realized that reforming their economies has become inevitable. Reforms have started in a number of countries, such as Egypt, Tunisia, Morocco, along with oil exporting countries (in particular, GCC countries). The discussion in the first panel will focus on the the current state of economies in the region and the prospects for economic reform. The debate will tackle the major challenges facing the region, such as high youth unemployment and very low female labor market participation, and the policies and reforms needed to address them.

Panel II– The Economics of Post-Conflict Reconstruction in the Region: Towards a New Social Contract

Violence and conflict have contributed to the slow growth in the MENA region over the past 6 years, as the civil wars in Libya, Syria and Yemen have had impacts far beyond their borders. Neighboring countries such as Lebanon and Jordan have coped with a massive influx of refugees, and countries such as Tunisia have had one of their most important sectors, tourism significantly impacted. At the same time, the prospects for peace in Libya, Syria and Yemen and potential recovery and reconstruction remain one of the keys to resuming growth over the next decade. The positive impact of reconstruction, however, depends on how the process is managed. The discussion in the second panel will focus on the principles of reconstruction, and how any potential effort should address the causes of conflict as well as rebuilding critical infrastructure. One of the common causes of all three of the regional civil wars is a breakdown of trust between citizens and their government. This panel will focus on ways to restore that trust and rebuild the social contract between citizens and their government, and the role of any potential reconstruction in that process.

Click here to watch live streaming

Agenda

 

16:45 – 17:00

Registration

17:00 – 17:10

WELCOMING REMARKS

- Karim El Aynaoui, Managing Director, OCP Policy Center 

17:10 –17:30

PANEL I: 6 YEARS AFTER THE ARAB SPRING: THE ECONOMIC SITUATION IN MENA AND THE PROSPECTS FOR GROWTH AND REFORM

MODERATOR

Line Rifai, Business Editor, France 24

SPEAKERS                

- Shanta Devarajan, Middle East and North Africa Chief Economist, World Bank
- Hafez Ghanem, Middle East and North Africa Vice President, World Bank
- Fathallah Oualalou, Senior Fellow, OCP Policy Center and Former Moroccan Minister of Economy and Finance, of Privatisation and Tourism, Former Mayor, City of Rabat
- Abdallah Saaf, Senior Fellow, OCP Policy Center, Political Scientist, and Former Minister of Education, Morocco

17:30 –18:00

PANEL II: THE ECONOMICS OF POST-CONFLICT RECONSTRUCTION IN THE REGION: TOWARDS A NEW SOCIAL CONTRACT

MODERATOR

Line Rifai, Business Editor, France 24

SPEAKERS                

- Shanta Devarajan, Middle East and North Africa Chief Economist, World Bank
- Hafez Ghanem, Middle East and North Africa Vice President, World Bank
- Fathallah Oualalou, Senior Fellow, OCP Policy Center and Former Moroccan Minister of Economy and Finance, of Privatization and Tourism, Former Mayor, City of Rabat
- Massa Mufti, Co-founder and Chair, Sonbola Group for Education and Development

18:00 –18:20

Discussion

18:20 –18:30

CONCLUDING REMARKS

Keep me informed
About the Speakers :
  • Shanta Devarajan

    Middle East and North Africa Chief Economist, World Bank

    Shantayanan Devarajan is the Chief Economist of the World Bank’s Middle East and North Africa Region.  Since joining the World Bank in 1991, he has been a Principal Economist and Research Manager for Public Economics in the Development Research Group, and the Chief Economist of the Human Development Network, South Asia, and Africa Region. He was the director of the World Development Report 2004, Making Services Work for Poor People. Before 1991, he was on the faculty of Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government.

    The author or co-author of over 100 publications, Mr. Devarajan’s research covers public economics, trade policy, natural resources and the environment, and general equilibrium modeling of developing countries. Born in Sri Lanka, Mr. Devarajan received his B.A. in mathematics from Princeton University and his Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Berkeley.

  • Karim El Aynaoui

    Directeur Général, OCP Policy Center

    Karim El Aynaoui is currently Managing Director of OCP Policy Center, a think tank based in Rabat. He also serves as advisor to the CEO and Chairman of OCP Group, a global leader in the phosphate sector. From 2005 to 2012, he worked at Bank Al-Maghrib, the Central Bank of Morocco. He was the Director of Economics and International Relations, where he provided strategic leadership in defining and supporting monetary policy analysis and strategy. He was also in charge of the Statistical and International Relations Divisions of the Central Bank, led the research division and was a member of the Governor’s Cabinet. Before joining Bank Al-Maghrib, Karim El Aynaoui worked for eight years at the World Bank, both in its Middle Eastern and North Africa, and Africa regions as an economist.

    He has published papers, books and articles in scientific journals on macroeconomic issues in developing countries. Recently, he co-authored a book outlining a growth strategy for Morocco and was the guest editor of a special issue on food price volatility in Oxford Economic Papers. Karim El Aynaoui is a board member of the OCP Foundation, member of the Strategic Advisory Board of the French Institute of International Relations (IFRI) and member of the COP22 Scientific Committee. He is also member of the Malabo Montpellier Panel, a group of leading African and European experts from the fields of agriculture, ecology, nutrition, public policy and global development. He holds a PhD in economics from the University of Bordeaux, where he taught for three years courses in statistics and economics.

  • Hafez Ghanem

    Middle East and North Africa Vice President, World Bank

    Hafez Ghanem, an Egyptian and French national, is the Vice President of the World Bank for the Middle East and North Africa since March 2, 2015. He is a development expert with more than thirty years of experience in policy analysis, project formulation and supervision, and management of multinational institutions. Dr. Ghanem leads the World Bank’s engagement with 20 Middle East and North African countries through a portfolio of ongoing projects, technical assistance and grants worth more than US$13 billion. Eradicating extreme poverty and promoting shared prosperity through the creation of opportunities are core to his vision for the Middle East and North Africa Region.

    Prior to his appointment as Vice President, Dr. Ghanem was a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution in the Global Economy and Development program leading the Arab economies project, focused on the impact of political transition on Arab economic development.

    Between 2007 and 2012, he served as the Assistant Director-General at the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). Thus, he was responsible for the Economic and Social Development Department and FAO’s analytical work on agricultural economics and food security, trade and markets, gender and equity, and statistics.    In this role he and his counterpart in OECD coordinated the preparation of the International Organizations’ recommendations to the 2011 G20 meeting on how to respond the global food crisis.  He also led the reforms of the Committee on World Food Security to make it more inclusive and responsive to country needs.

    Dr. Ghanem returns to the World Bank where he had already 24 years’ experience (1983-2007), and has worked on Bank operations and initiatives in over 20 countries in Africa, Europe and Central Asia, Middle East and North Africa, and Southeast Asia. His previous positions at the World Bank include: Country Director for Nigeria where he led a multinational team of more than 100 professionals, managing the Bank’s loan portfolio of some USD 1.5 billion; Country Director for Madagascar, Comoros, Mauritius and Seychelles; and Sector Leader for Public Economics and Trade Policy in the Europe and Central Asia Region. Dr. Ghanem joined the World Bank in 1983 as a Young Professional and worked as a research economist before moving on to senior economist roles in West Africa and South Asia.

    He has many publications in professional journals and was a member of the core team that produced the World Bank’s 1995 World Development Report.

    He holds a bachelor’s and master’s degree in Economics from the American University in Cairo and a PhD in Economics from the University of California, Davis. He is fluent in Arabic, English and French.

  • Massa Mufti-Hamwi

    Co-founder and Chair, Sonbola Group for Education and Development

    Over the past 22 years, Massa Mufti has accumulated a substantive depth of diversified knowledge and experience in the field of Education and Learning across educational institutions in the United States of America, Lebanon and Syria.

    Massa is currently highly engaged in Syrian civil society and in supporting Syrian refugees in the field of Education. She is the co-founder and Chair of Sonbola Group For Education & Development (SONBOLA), an NGO that provides quality education for Syrian refugee children in Lebanon with special focus on innovation and skills. Massa is also a consultant at ESCWA on Education for Syria and has been involved in various consultancy projects relating to education management and development as well as in research projects that address Emergency Education, Non-Formal Education, Interactive and Museum-based Learning, Citizenship Education and more.

    She was the Chair of the Steering Committee (2011-2012) of MENIT, the GIZ funded initiative of Middle East Network for Innovative Teaching and Learning (www.menit.me).

    In addition to two Masters Degrees one in French Literature (Catholic University of America, DC), the other in Education Policies and Leadership (AUB), Massa has a certified training in Education in Emergencies-INEE (Beirut, 2013), a certificate in Business Development (CISCO-British Council, Beirut, 2012), Certified training on Executive Management and Leadership from Harvard Business School (2011), and certified training in Public Speaking (London, 2011), and a certified training on Situational Leadership (Damascus,2010).

    She has recently spoke about Syria Education Crisis at one of the UN General Assembly panels in NY (Sept 21, 2016), and has spoken at the UK CSO and Donors Conference on Syria (Feb 3-4, 2016; She spoke also about the role of civil society in peace building at the UN-Global Compact Business For Peace in Dubai (Oct, 2016). She is a regular speaker at NAMES (North Africa and Middle East Network for Science Museums), and has recently spoken about Education at Time of Conflict at NAMES’s recent conference in Amman (Oct 27-28, 2016); Additionally, and among several other conferences, she attended “Teach For All” conference in Puebla, Mexico (Oct, 2014), Global Humanitarian Forum at the United Nations (Dec, 2014), and the World Humanitarian Summit in Istanbul (May 2016) among many others.

  • Fathallah Oualalou

    Senior Fellow, OCP policy Center, Economist, and Former Ministre of Economy and Finance, of Privatisation and Tourism, Former Mayor, City of Rabat.

    Fathallah Oualalou was born in 1942 in Rabat. He graduated in economy from Mohammed V University in 1964 and obtained a diploma on economy in 1966 in Paris. He was appointed Ministry of Economy in 1998 and Ministry of Finance in 2002. He is professor at Mohammed V University and chairs the Association of Moroccan Economists and Union of Arab Economists. After over 20 years as member of the Municipal Council, he was Mayor of Rabat from 2009 to 2015.

  • Line Rifai

    Line Rifai, Business Editor, France 24.

  • Abdellah Saaf

    Abdallah Saaf is a professor of Political sciences at Mohamed V Rabat University, Director of the Center for Studies in Social Sciences Research (CERSS), and Founder of the Moroccan Association of Political Science and Director of Abhath Review. Professor Saaf was a member of the commission in charge of revising the Constitution during July 2011, and member of the Scientific Committee at the Global Forum for Humans rights. Professor Saaf is a former Minister of Education from 1998 to 2004. He also manages an annual publication called “Strategic Report of Morocco” since 1995.

Add to Calendar 13/04/2017 09:00 13/04/2017 09:00 Africa/Casablanca 3ème édition des Dialogues Stratégiques : Recomposition géopolitique du Proche et Moyen Orient, et Golfe arabo-persique et nouvelle physionomie du Golfe de Guinée Paris, France  /Séminaire par invitation/ HEC Center for Geopolitics et OCP Policy Center ont lancé en 2016, le premier cycle des «Strategic Dialogues», une plateforme d’analyse et de débat stratégique autour des principaux enjeux géopolitiques et sécuritaires internationaux, mais également régionaux revêtant une importance capitale pour les continents européen et africain. Paris, France OCP Policy Center contact@ocppc.ma false DD/MM/YYYY

3ème édition des Dialogues Stratégiques : Recomposition géopolitique du Proche et Moyen Orient, et Golfe arabo-persique et nouvelle physionomie du Golfe de Guinée

Paris, France 

Séminaire par invitation

HEC Center for Geopolitics et OCP Policy Center ont lancé en 2016, le premier cycle des «Strategic Dialogues», une plateforme d’analyse et de débat stratégique autour des principaux enjeux géopolitiques et sécuritaires internationaux, mais également régionaux revêtant une importance capitale pour les continents européen et africain.

Ce cycle de séminaires biannuel a pour vocation d’offrir un environnement «policy oriented», où experts et chercheurs des think tanks et des milieux académiques des deux centres se réunissent, afin de confronter et d’enrichir des analyses tant diverses que multidisciplinaires, autour d’une question internationale en matinée, et d’une question d’intérêt régional en après-midi.

Dans la finalité de rendre les fruits de cette collaboration accessibles aux participants ainsi qu’aux parties prenantes intéressées, les discussions et échanges feront l’objet de policy papers publiés et partagés en aval des séminaires. A cet effet, les Policy Papers présentés dans le cadre de la deuxième édition portant le repositionnement et la réémergence de la Russie sur l’échiquier mondial ainsi que les transformations et dynamiques externes de l’Afrique de l’Est ont été compilés en un second volume du livre « Dialogues Stratégiques », et seront publiés au mois d’avril.

En outre, le premier volume du livre qui a traité des nouveaux axes stratégiques de la Chine et sur les défis sécuritaires de la bande sahélo-saharienne est disponible en format électronique au niveau du lien ci-dessous.

Ainsi, cette troisième réunion s’articulera autour de la recomposition géopolitique du Moyen Orient, ainsi que de la nouvelle physionomie du Golfe de Guinée.

 

Agenda

08:45 – 09 :00

Session d’ouverture

- Pascal Chaigneau, Directeur, HEC Center for Geopolitics

- Karim El Aynaoui, Directeur, OCP Policy Center

Première Séance: La complexification de la zone Proche et Moyen Orient et Golfe arabo-persique

09:00 – 10:00       

SESSION I : DE LA SYRIE AU YEMEN - NOUVELLE EQUATION GEOPOLITIQUE ET MILITAIRE, ET RUPTURES EN COUR

Quatre ans après le début de la guerre civile en Syrie et un peu plus d’un an après l’instauration d’un califat par l’État islamique en Irak et au Levant, les rapports de force sur le terrain se sont complexifiés. Une nouvelle géopolitique et axe militaire est en train de se dessiner de la Syrie au Yémen, et il convient d’en analyser les ruptures en cours, sous les angles des intérêts géopolitique, militaire, ainsi qu’en termes du droit et des relations internationales.

Panélistes :

- Pascal Chaigneau, directeur général, HEC Center for Geopolitics

- Mohammed Loulichki, Senior Fellow, OCP Policy Center 

- Alain Oudot de Dainville, Amiral, Président honoraire d'ODAS

10:00 – 10:45

SESSION II : RESILIENCE ET GEO-ECONOMIE DES MONARCHIES DU GOLFE

En dépit de leur proximité géographique à ces recompositions et crises, et de la tendance baissière des prix du pétrole, la géo-économie des monarchies arabes du Golfe semble se distinguer par son caractère de résilience. Dans un temps où les observateurs et spécialistes se précipitent pour annoncer des évolutions de régimes politiques et économiques des monarchies du Golfe, il conviendra d’identifier les fondements des mécanismes économiques et d’en démystifier l’impact sur la géopolitique régionale et mondiale aujourd’hui.

Panélistes :

- Karim El Aynaoui, Economiste et Directeur, OCP Policy Center

- Henri-Louis Védie, Professeur émérite à HEC, Centre HEC de géopolitique

10:45 – 11:00        

Pause – Café

11:00 – 11:45

SESSION III: CROISSANT CHIITE ET IRAN: QUELLE HEGEMONIE REGIONALE ?

Ces rapports de force sont également dictés par les référents ethniques et religieux. Dans ce sens, au Moyen-Orient, le « croissant chiite » est perçu comme un moyen de faire évoluer ces rapports en faveur de l’Iran et, donc, en défaveur des autres régimes politiques de la région, pour la plupart attachés au sunnisme. Allant de l’Iran au Liban, en passant par l’Irak et la Syrie alaouite alliée à l’Iran, il importe d’étudier la géographie du chiisme, et d’en tirer d’importants enseignements géopolitiques et sécuritaires, en prenant la juste mesure du poids de l’Iran et de la répartition religieuse dans la région.

Panélistes :

- Abdelhak Bassou, Senior Fellow, OCP Policy Center

- Fereydoun Khavand, maître de conférences à l’Université Paris V Sorbonne Paris Cité, consultant Iran de Radio France Internationale 

11:45 – 13:00

SESSION IV: JEU DES ACTEURS EXTERIEURS ET PUISSANCES REGIONALES AU MOYEN-ORIENT

Enfin, la complexification de la zone Proche et Moyen Orient et Golfe arabo-persique revient sans doute également aux interventions de différentes natures des acteurs extérieurs et des puissances régionales. Il importera d’analyser les stratégies d’influence économique, politique et sécuritaire de la Chine, des Etats-Unis, de l’Europe et de l’Arabie Saoudite. Il sera également question de dresser un bilan général de l’interventionnisme occidental au Moyen Orient.

Panélistes :

- Jeremy Ghez, Directeur des études du Centre HEC de géopolitique (Etats Unis)

- Larabi Jaidi, Senior Fellow, OCP Policy Center (Europe)

- Fathallah Oualalou, Senior Fellow, OCP Policy Center (Chine)

- Abdallah Saaf, Senior Fellow, OCP Policy Center (Arabie Saoudite)

13:00 – 14:30        

Déjeuner

14:30 – 15:00

KEYNOTE SPEECH: POLITIQUES OCCIDENTALES AU MOYEN ORIENT : QUEL BILAN ?

- Hubert Védrine, Ancien Ministre des Affaires Etrangères, France          

 

Deuxième Séance : Le Golfe de Guinée dans la nouvelle géopolitique africaine

 

15:00 – 15:50

SESSION V: LE NOUVEAU CONTEXTE ECONOMIQUE REGIONAL, GEOPOLITIQUE ET SECURITAIRE

Depuis le début des années 2000, la région du golfe de Guinée fait l’objet d’une attention particulière de la part de la communauté internationale, tant par les convoitises qu’elle suscite avec ses nombreuses ressources naturelles (pétrole, ressources halieutiques, minerais, forêt, etc.) que par les menaces (terrorisme, trafic de drogue, piraterie maritime, etc.) qu’elle représente. Il conviendra d’aborder cet espace complexe selon un point de vue historique, institutionnel, géopolitique et sécuritaire.

Panélistes :

- Moubarack Lo, Economiste en Chef, Cellule économique du Premier Ministre du Sénégal et Senior Fellow, OCP Policy Center

- Jérôme Evrard, chercheur en sciences sociales,  Centre HEC de géopolitique 

- Henri-Louis Védie, professeur émérite à HEC, Centre HEC de géopolitique

15:50 – 16:25

Session VI: LES STRATEGIES DES ACTEURS EXTERIEURS

En dépit des divergences de délimitation géographique, le Golfe de Guinée au large des côtes ouest-africaines contient d'énormes gisements gazier et pétrolier estimés à plus de 10 milliards de barils. Il convient dans ce contexte de cerner l'intérêt des Etats-Unis pour la région, et qui ne cesse de croître avec l'augmentation des explorations pétrolières dans la zone, particulièrement alors que la flotte navale ouest-africaine n'a pas la capacité de protéger les plateformes pétrolières de cette zone maritime aux enjeux sécuritaires cruciaux.

Panélistes :

- Thierry Garcin, Directeur de l’émission « Géopolitique » de France Culture

- Alfredo Valladao, Professeur, Sciences Po Paris et Senior Fellow, OCP Policy Center

16:25 – 16:40

Pause-Café

16:40 – 17:15

SESSION VII: LE NIGERIA ET SES FRAGILITES

Géant du Golfe de Guinée et de l’Afrique, le Nigeria est une puissance émergente, appelée à devenir le troisième pays le plus peuplé de la planète d’ici 2050, après l’Inde et la Chine. Il est le plus gros producteur de pétrole du continent, avec des réserves en hydrocarbures bien supérieures à celles de son rival angolais, voire de la Libye. Pourtant, des fragilités politiques, sécuritaires et ethniques persistent. Il conviendra dans ce sens d’analyser la complexité de cet acteur majeur du continent africain.

Panélistes :

- Daniel Bach, directeur de recherches au CNRS, directeur honoraire du Centre d’études de l’Afrique Subsaharienne

- Khalid Moukite, Professeur Habilité, IURS, Université Mohamed 5-Rabat 

 

 

Related Publication : Dialogues Stratégiques : Volume II 

 

A propos d’HEC Center for Geopolitics

Le centre HEC de géopolitique a été créé en 2013 sous la présidence de Boutros Boutros Ghali, ancien secrétaire général des Nations Unies et de l’Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie.

Il est dirigé par le Pr. Pascal Chaigneau. La direction des études y est assurée par le Pr. Jeremy Ghez. Une équipe de quatorze professeurs et de plusieurs chercheurs associés y assume des missions de formation des équipes de direction des grandes entreprises internationales et des contrats de recherche.

Keep me informed
Add to Calendar 05/04/2017 12:30 05/04/2017 14:00 Africa/Casablanca Green Revolution in Vietnam and Lessons Learned for the African Countries For over the past 30 years of economic reforms (/Doi moi/), Vietnam has gained major achievement in agricultural development. Thanks to the liberalization policy, from a net food-imported country, Vietnam has become among the top exporters of many agricultural products such as rice, coffee, pepper, etc. Millions of people in the rural areas have been lifted out of chronicle pover... Siège OCP Casablanca OCP Policy Center contact@ocppc.ma false DD/MM/YYYY

Green Revolution in Vietnam and Lessons Learned for the African Countries

For over the past 30 years of economic reforms (Doi moi), Vietnam has gained major achievement in agricultural development. Thanks to the liberalization policy, from a net food-imported country, Vietnam has become among the top exporters of many agricultural products such as rice, coffee, pepper, etc. Millions of people in the rural areas have been lifted out of chronicle poverty and hunger. The face of the rural areas has been progressively changed. Vietnam’s successful efforts in hunger eradication and poverty alleviation were highly appreciated by the donor community, including the development organizations such as the World Bank, Asian Development Bank, and the United Nations Development Program.  

However, at present Vietnam’ agricultural sector has to deal with mounting challenges in its course of further development. Despite the continuous expansion in production volume, the agricultural method in Vietnam is mostly a small-scale, low-tech farming that constrains the crop productivity and generates very low added-value. Emerging factors such as diminution of arable lands due to rapid urbanization, market price fluctuation and severe weather brought by global warming begin to adversely affect agricultural production. New policy measures therefore must be adopted to encourage private investment in agriculture, introduction of new models such as climate-smart or green agriculture, and application of modern technology to increase productivity at the same time creating jobs for millions of agricultural workers and reversing the massive rural–urban migration flux.

Successful experiences of Vietnam in the Green Revolution and its ways of addressing the emerging challenges present meaningful lessons for other developing countries, especially those in Africa, in their efforts of agricultural reforms and development.   

Keep me informed
About the Speaker :
  • Dr. Nguyen Manh Hung

    Associate Professor Nguyen Manh Hung is Director General of the Institute for Africa and Middle East Studies. He received the Ph.D from the University of Delaware, USA. His research interest is political economy of development, with the focus on institutional quality and governance. He has been working as consultant for a number of international organizations such as the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Asian Development Bank, the World Bank among other institutions.

Add to Calendar 10/04/2017 11:00 10/04/2017 12:00 Africa/Casablanca Présentation du livre « Où va le monde? » A OCP Policy Center, Rabat, /par invitation/ En collaboration avec l’Institut français du Maroc, OCP Policy Center a le plaisir d’accueillir la présentation du livre «Où va le monde ?» co-écrit par Pascal Lamy, ancien commissaire européen et ancien directeur général de l'OMC, et Nicole Gnesotto, spécialiste de géopolitique, avec Jean Michel Baer, le lundi 10 avril 2017 de 11h à 1... OCP Policy Center, Rabat OCP Policy Center contact@ocppc.ma false DD/MM/YYYY

Présentation du livre « Où va le monde? »

A OCP Policy Center, Rabat, par invitation

En collaboration avec l’Institut français du Maroc, OCP Policy Center a le plaisir d’accueillir la présentation du livre «Où va le monde ?» co-écrit par Pascal Lamy, ancien commissaire européen et ancien directeur général de l'OMC, et Nicole Gnesotto, spécialiste de géopolitique, avec Jean Michel Baer, le lundi 10 avril 2017 de 11h à 12h30, au sein des locaux du think tank à Rabat. Face au Brexit et aux tendances nationalistes des politiques du nouveau président américain, les auteurs prônent une redéfinition des missions et des ambitions de l'Europe.

Présidée par Fathallah Oualalou, ancien Ministre de l’économie et des Finances marocain et Senior Fellow à OCP Policy Center, cette discussion de haut niveau accueillera Pascal Lamy, ancien Directeur général de l'OMC, qui animera une présentation du livre à travers les questionnements suivants, ayant trait à la géopolitique contemporaine et aux nouvelles mutations de la mondialisation dans ce contexte mondial incertain :

- Pourquoi le désordre, la violence, le chaos donnent-ils le sentiment d’être les nouvelles règles du système international, alors que la paix, la prospérité, la liberté, la règle du droit étaient données, il y a à peine vingt ans, comme les promesses de la fin de la guerre froide ?

- Quelles dynamiques dominent aujourd’hui le monde ?

- Le marché ou la force ? L’économie ou la géopolitique ?

- La première va-t-elle réussir à pacifier le monde et l’unir dans un destin commun ?

- La seconde finira-t-elle par casser l’unification des marchés au profit de désordres et de rivalités incontrôlés ?

- Quelles doivent être les attentes des pays en développement en réponse à ces mutations ?

Agenda

 
11:00-11:15  

MOT D’OUVERTURE

Jean Marc Berthon, Directeur général, Institut français, Maroc

Fathallah Oualalou, Senior Fellow OCP Policy Center

11:15 – 12:00

PRESENTATION DU LIVRE : OU VA LE MONDE ?

Pascal Lamy, ancien Directeur Général, Organisation Mondial du Commerce

12:00 – 12 :30 

DEBAT

Keep me informed
About the Speakers :
  • Pascal Lamy

    Ancien commissaire européen et ancien directeur général de l'OMC

    M. Lamy est diplômé de l'École des Hautes Études Commerciales (HEC) de Paris, de l'Institut d'Études Politiques (IEP) et de l'École Nationale d'Administration (ENA). Il commence sa carrière dans la fonction publique française à l'Inspection générale des Finances et au Trésor. Il devient ensuite conseiller du Ministre des finances, M. Jacques Delors, puis du Premier Ministre M. Pierre Mauroy.

     À Bruxelles de 1985 à 1994, Pascal Lamy exerce les fonctions de Directeur de Cabinet du Président de la Commission européenne, M. Jacques Delors, dont il est le représentant en qualité de “sherpa” au G-7. 

    En novembre 1994, il rejoint l'équipe chargée du redressement d'une banque française, le Crédit Lyonnais. Il devient ensuite le Directeur général de la banque jusqu'à sa privatisation en 1999.

    Entre 1999 et 2004, Pascal Lamy est Commissaire au commerce à la Commission européenne présidée par M. Romano Prodi.

     Après son mandat à Bruxelles, Pascal Lamy préside, pendant une brève période sabbatique, l'association “Notre Europe”, groupe de réflexion travaillant sur l'intégration européenne, et devient professeur associé à l'Institut d'Études Politiques de Paris et conseiller de Poul Nyrup Rasmussen (président du parti socialiste européen).

  • Fathallah Oualalou

    Senior Fellow, OCP Policy Center

    Fathallah Oualalou obtient une licence en sciences économiques à la faculté de Droit de ‎Rabat en 1964 et un DES en économie en 1966 à Paris.‎

    Outre son activité en tant qu'assistant au centre universitaire de ‎recherche scientifique, il sera président de l'UNEM et responsable de la ‎Confédération des Etudiants du Maghreb.‎

    En 1968, il soutiendra une thèse de Doctorat en économie à Paris, avant ‎de faire partie du corps enseignant de la faculté de Droit de Rabat, de ‎Casablanca et de l'ENA.‎

    De 1968 à 1997, il publiera de nombreux travaux (ouvrages, articles, ‎etc...) dans les domaines de la théorie économique, de l'économie ‎financière, de l'économie des pays du Maghreb et du monde arabe et des ‎relations Europe-monde arabe.‎

    En 1972, il participera au sein du "groupe de Rabat", au lancement de ‎l'USFP, dont il devient un des membres influents. De 1968 à 1977, il sera ‎également membre du bureau national du Syndicat national de l'enseignement ‎supérieur (SNE-SUP). En 1972, avec l'économiste feu Abdelaziz Belal, il ‎crée l'Association des économistes marocains, dont il est président depuis ‎‎1982.‎

    Parallèlement, il sera élu à plusieurs reprises président de l'Union des ‎économistes arabes. Il est élu plusieurs fois au Conseil municipal à Rabat ‎et député à la Chambre des représentants.‎

    Le 14 mars 1998, feu SM Hassan II le nomme ministre de l'Economie et des ‎finances.

Add to Calendar 27/03/2017 17:30 27/03/2017 19:00 Africa/Casablanca Trump and Trade OCP Policy Center, Rabat While the first months of 2017 in Morocco were characterized by the country’s historic diplomatic feat in re-joining the African Union, and its positive willingness of integrating the Economic Community of Western African States (ECOWAS), it is safe to say that the atmosphere was quite different in the Northern hemisphere. For both the European Union and ... OCP Policy Center, Rabat OCP Policy Center contact@ocppc.ma false DD/MM/YYYY

Trump and Trade

OCP Policy Center, Rabat

While the first months of 2017 in Morocco were characterized by the country’s historic diplomatic feat in re-joining the African Union, and its positive willingness of integrating the Economic Community of Western African States (ECOWAS), it is safe to say that the atmosphere was quite different in the Northern hemisphere. For both the European Union and the US, 2016 has proven to be a grim year, particularly in light of the populist wave that swept through the West. This has led the UK to opt for Brexit, a situation that has come as a surprise to the international community, and Americans to vote for a businessman as their 45th president. Donald J. Trump, the said businessman, has no previous political experience, and ran a controversial campaign that places protectionism at the heart of his economic strategy. This, in conjunction with the general leitmotif of making America great again, will make for a dangerous rollercoaster ride in the land of uncertainty.

Donald Trump has been calling for several sovereign measures such as “Buying American” and “Hiring American”, in support of his “America First” strategy. As the Trump administration considers that the U.S. has been harmed by poor trade deals, the country has not only withdrawn from the Trans Pacific Partnership, a deal that took years of hard negotiations to come about, but is also looking to renegotiate the NAFTA, a free trade treaty that the U.S. could quit with just a six month notice without consulting Congress.

In addition to that, companies that “took jobs away from America” and trade partners that behaved “unfairly” are threatened by substantial tariffs and tax raises. As a consequence to these threats, some major industrial companies have already promised to reinvest massively in the U.S. territory. However, in a globalized world, where supply chains are complex and where the manufacturing process transcends state borders, the protectionist strategy of Donald Trump might have, in the long term, the opposite effect and might make recession great again instead of making America great again.

In order to understand the implications of the new American protectionist policy, OCP Policy Center will be holding, on March 27, a talk with Dr. Theodore Moran, Fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. During this event Dr Moran will address the following issues, and lead a discussion of the implications for developed and developing countries

How might old-fashioned tariffs affect globalized supply chains?

Will the approach of border-tax proposals shift jobs back to the US?

What are the implications for Developed and Developing countries?

 

Keep me informed
About the Speaker :
  • Theodore H. Moran

    Theodore H. Moran holds the Marcus Wallenberg Chair at the School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University, where he teaches and conducts research at the intersection of international economics, business, foreign affairs, and public policy. Dr. Moran is founder of the Landegger Program in International Business Diplomacy, and serves as Director in providing courses on international business-government relations and negotiations to some 600 undergraduate and graduate students each year.

    His recent books include Foreign Direct Investment in the United States: Benefits, Suspicions, and Risks with Special Attention to FDI from China (with Lindsay Oldenski, Peterson Institute for International Economics, 2013), Foreign Direct Investment and Development: Launching a Second Generation of Policy Research: Avoiding the Mistakes of the First, Reevaluating Policies for Developed and Developing Countries (Peterson Institute for International Economics, 2011).

    Dr. Moran is a consultant to multinational agencies and governments on strategies to use foreign direct investment for development, to foster supply chain expansion, and to promote backward linkages via local vendor development and certification programs. He is advisor to the Trade and Competitiveness Initiative of the IFC/World Bank.

    Professor Moran received his PhD from Harvard. He is a Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics.

Add to Calendar 20/03/2017 14:30 20/03/2017 14:30 Africa/Casablanca event taoufik hide Not specified OCP Policy Center contact@ocppc.ma false DD/MM/YYYY

event taoufik hide

Keep me informed
Add to Calendar 23/03/2017 14:00 25/03/2017 14:00 Africa/Casablanca Brussels Forum 2017 Organized by the German Marshall Fund of the United States. *By Invitation only*. OCP Policy Center is a key partner for the Brussels Forum organized by German Marshall Fund of the United States between March 23rd and 25th, 2017 in Brussels. Brussels, Belgium OCP Policy Center contact@ocppc.ma false DD/MM/YYYY

Brussels Forum 2017

Organized by the German Marshall Fund of the United States.

By Invitation only.

OCP Policy Center is a key partner for the Brussels Forum organized by German Marshall Fund of the United States between March 23rd and 25th, 2017 in Brussels.

Brussels Forum is an annual high-level meeting of the most influential North American and European political, corporate, and intellectual leaders to address pressing challenges currently facing both sides of the Atlantic. Participants include heads of state, senior officials from the European Union institutions and the member states, U.S. Cabinet officials, Congressional representatives, Parliamentarians, academics, and media.

Leaders on both sides of the Atlantic continue to deepen transatlantic cooperation on a vast array of distinctly new and global challenges from the international financial crisis to climate change and energy security to the retention of high-skilled workers, yet there is no single transatlantic forum focused on this broad and increasingly complex global agenda. Brussels Forum provides a venue for the transatlantic community to address these pressing issues. By bringing together leading politicians, thinkers, journalists, and business representatives, Brussels Forum helps shape a new transatlantic agenda that can adapt to changing global realities and new threats.

The Brussels Forum agenda reflects the growing diversity of issues at the core of the transatlantic relationship, as well as the increasing geographic reach of transatlantic cooperation. It includes discussion sessions on broad themes, such as the global financial crisis, Russia, and Afghanistan. Breakout sessions held under the Chatham House Rule explore challenges like Asia, the Middle East, and climate change. Keynote addresses by senior officials punctuate a gathering heavily tilted toward intimate exchange of dialogue among panelists and participants.

Plenary Sessions:

- Addressing Popular Discontent at Home and Abroad

- US Leadership in a Changing Security Environment

- Beyond the Middle East Disorder

- Does the World Want to be Connected? (part 1. Economics ; part 2. Ideas, Identities, and Interconnectivity)

- The Reality of Economic Growth

- The Black Sea and Beyond: Strategies for a Troubled Periphery

- Reset or Retreat: The Cost of Rapprochement with Russia

- The Next Conflict? (part 1 North Korea; part 2. Eastern Europe and the Caucasus)

- Transatlantic Insecurity

Night-Owl Sessions:

- Is the Internet a Force for Good?

- A New Vision for Europe

- The Continuous Struggle: Living with Terrorism

- Information Warfare

- Rebooting Democracy

- The West in Trouble? Responses from Partners around the Globe

Young Professional Summit

Brussels Forum’s Young Professionals Summit (YPS) is an annual flagship event hosted by The German Marshall Fund of the United States that connects the next generation of leaders with influential politicians, thinkers, journalists, and business representatives to discuss pressing policy challenges for the transatlantic community.

The Young Professionals Summit promotes debate between generations and builds networks among young leaders through highly interactive and small group sessions. YPS fosters dialogue, leadership training, and peer-to-peer learning through a tailor-made program for rising leaders as well as unique access to the larger Brussels Forum.

YPS will be held March 22 - 23, 2017 in Brussels.

Further information on the forum and the summit is available on http://brussels.gmfus.org/

Keep me informed
Add to Calendar 10/03/2017 15:00 10/03/2017 15:00 Africa/Casablanca event adil hide Not specified OCP Policy Center contact@ocppc.ma false DD/MM/YYYY

event adil hide

Keep me informed
Add to Calendar 14/03/2017 15:00 14/03/2017 18:00 Africa/Casablanca Global Economic Outlook Centre Links, Casablanca Le Centre LINKS et OCP Policy Center organisent en partenariat la présentation du /Global Economic Outlook/ par Dr. Uri Dadush, Senior Fellow à l’OCP Policy Center le 14 mars 2017 à 15h dans les locaux du centre LINKS à Casablanca. Centre Links, Casablanca OCP Policy Center contact@ocppc.ma false DD/MM/YYYY

Global Economic Outlook

Centre Links, Casablanca

Le Centre LINKS et OCP Policy Center organisent en partenariat la présentation du Global Economic Outlook par Dr. Uri Dadush, Senior Fellow à l’OCP Policy Center le 14 mars 2017 à 15h dans les locaux du centre LINKS à Casablanca.

Lors de cette présentation, Dr. Dadush présentera l’état de l’économie mondiale.

L’Economie mondiale poursuit sa reprise. L’Europe, principal partenaire économique du Maroc, ne semble pas être sérieusement affecté par le Brexit, au moins à court terme.  Quant aux actionnaires détenant  d’importantes parts de marché aux EUA, ces derniers ont enregistré des records. Néanmoins, le rôle du commerce mondiale dans la dynamisation de l’activité demeure entourée d’incertitudes liées principalement aux politiques annoncées par le nouveau président des Etats-Unis et la montée en force des mouvements nationalistes en Europe.  Sur la région MENA, la hausse des prix du pétrole a atténué les pressions sur les équilibres des pays producteurs de cette matière première, toutefois, la situation politique critique continue de peser sur l’avenir de la région.

Quelles perspectives pour les années 2017 et 2018 ? l’optimisme des entreprises et des marchés financiers est-il justifié ? la rhétorique pro-protectionnisme qui se fait retentir fréquemment à l’échelle international donnerait-elle suite à une stagnation séculaire ? et Quel impact sur la situation économique au Maroc ?

Keep me informed
About the Speaker :
  • Uri Dadush

    Uri Dadush est Senior Fellow à OCP Policy Center. Il était Senior Associate et directeur du programme d’économie internationale de Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Ses travaux actuels sont axés sur les tendances de l’économie mondiale et sur la crise financière. Ressortissant français, Dr Dadush a été directeur du service du Commerce international de la Banque mondiale pendant six ans, et, auparavant, directeur de la politique économique de cette organisation pendant trois ans. Parallèlement, il a aussi été à la tête du World Economy Group de la Banque mondiale au cours des onze dernières années, supervisant l’élaboration des rapports phares de la Banque consacrés à l’économie internationale sur cette période. Avant d’entrer à la Banque mondiale, il a été PDG de l’Economist Intelligence Unit, une division de l’Economist Group. Dr Dadush a obtenu un PhD d’économie de l’entreprise à l’université d’Harvard, où il s’était spécialisé dans le commerce international.

Add to Calendar 31/08/2017 17:00 31/08/2017 17:00 Africa/Casablanca Call for Papers : Les politiques économiques et le financement dans les pays en développement .... Economic policies and financing in developing countries Les exigences du développement économique et social dans les les pays en développement notamment africaines sont énormes. Elles sont confrontées à un défi d’augmentation de leur taux de croissance. Ce challenge présuppose un immense effort de mobilisation des financements interne et externe alors même que s’opère à l’éc... OCP Policy Center, Rabat OCP Policy Center contact@ocppc.ma false DD/MM/YYYY

Call for Papers : Les politiques économiques et le financement dans les pays en développement

Economic policies and financing in developing countries

Les exigences du développement économique et social dans les les pays en développement notamment africaines sont énormes. Elles sont confrontées à un défi d’augmentation de leur taux de croissance. Ce challenge présuppose un immense effort de mobilisation des financements interne et externe alors même que s’opère à l’échelle mondiale des changements au niveau des modalités de financement du développement : la montée des financements internes au détriment de l’aide publique au développement (l’APD) et des financements extérieurs. L’exigence en termes d’augmentation de leur taux de croissance afin de réduire le chômage et la pauvreté de façon significative s’inscrit dans le contexte d’un large programme de renforcement des investissements qui est fonctionnellement lié à une plus grande mobilisation de l’épargne. La littérature macroéconomique concernant l’impact de la libéralisation financière sur l’épargne est considérable. Cependant, la plupart des modèles examinant cette question ne renseignent pas de manière définitive sur le sens de la causalité entre les différentes variables en raison notamment de la complexité du processus de la réforme.

Les questionnements et analyses abordés par les différentes propositions de communication soumises doivent s’insérer dans les trois axes suivants :

Dans le premier axe, il s’agit de vérifier si les différents éléments apportés par la libéralisation financière retentissent sur l’épargne et réduisent les contraintes de financement et que celle-ci est canalisée vers le financement des investissements.

Suivant les travaux séminaux dans ce sens, Shaw et McKinnon (1973) ont mis en exergue les défaillances d’un système financier administré et les implications qui en résultent, notamment les risques d’une allocation inefficiente des ressources. C’est pour cette raison que la répression financière, dans toutes ses formes, est souvent critiquée par les instances internationales, entravant le bon fonctionnement des lois du marché. Suivant cette ligne théorique, la question de la libéralisation des mouvements de capitaux a été inscrite sur l’agenda des réformes financières prônées par le FMI. Pour les PED, leurs besoins d’investissements dépassent tellement l’épargne domestique, qu’il est primordial pour ces derniers d’ouvrir leur système financier et mobiliser les ressources financières extérieures, d’autant plus qu’ils offrent aux investisseurs internationaux des rendements nettement plus élevé. Toutefois, les effets escomptés derrière cette ouverture ne se sont que partiellement concrétisées. Le FMI défenseur du libéralisme, est devenu plus sceptique au sujet des gains potentiels associés à l’ouverture financière2. Sans une remise en question fondamentale du principe, il a estimé que les flux de capitaux sont également porteurs de risques pour les systèmes financiers domestiques. L’afflux des capitaux peut en effet ne pas se traduire par un financement de l’investissement et dégager des surplus de liquidité, mal géré souvent, qui ne font en conséquence qu’alimenter la formation de bulles sur les marchés des actifs.

Les travaux qui s’inscriront dans le second axe se focaliseront sur le rôle joué par l’intégration financière notamment l’ouverture du compte capital dans l’entretien de la discipline des politiques économiques et des interdépendances de long terme avec les principaux facteurs de performances macroéconomiques (croissance, attractivité des investissements étrangers).

Cependant, l’ouverture du compte capital pourrait aussi induire des coûts (liés notamment aux risques de court terme, des risques de fragilisation financière) et rendre permanent les écarts de développement financier entre les pays et contraindre financièrement les pays en développement. Bien que ces risques se soient matérialisés dans la plupart des pays dont le compte capital est ouvert, leur ampleur demeure contingente du cadre de gouvernance institutionnelle et économique. Les pays émergents ou PED disposant d’un cadre macroéconomique solide, à l’image d’une politique monétaire transparente et indépendante, et une politique budgétaire soutenable sont les moins affectés par la volatilité des mouvements de capitaux. C’est ainsi que l’intégration financière des PED est de nature à sanctionner les économies dont les politiques macroéconomiques ne sont pas adaptées et récompenser en général les bonnes pratiques en matière de gestion macroéconomique.

Dans le même ordre d’idées, sous le cadre macroéconomique actuel de la majorité des pays africains composé d'un régime d'ancrage du taux de change et des restrictions sur le compte de capital, il serait intéressant d'explorer les implications d’une libéralisation financière accrue sur la manière de concevoir la politique macroéconomique en général et les arbitrages éventuels qui en découlent. Le triangle d’incompatibilité de Mundell (1963) en est l’exemple le plus avancé dans ce sens, qui stipule qu’il n’est pas possible de concilier à la fois entre un compte capital ouvert, un régime de change fixe et une politique monétaire autonome. Une nouvelle doctrine est apparue de nos jours et qui stipule que même en présence d’un régime de change flexible, les flux de capitaux amoindrissent considérablement l’autonomie de la politique monétaire à atteindre les objectifs de stabilisation de l’activité. Ainsi, la flexibilité du taux de change n’est pas en mesure d’absorber complétement les chocs induits par les flux de capitaux et ces derniers finissent par influencer les conditions de financement dans les pays hôtes.

Les contributions au troisième axe devraient s’intéresser directement aux liens de causalité entre les politiques macroéconomiques et les contraintes de financement.

Sur un plan purement monétaire, la transition vers un cadre opérationnel plus souple de la politique monétaire a permis aux banques de disposer de plus d’autonomie et d’une plus grande marge de manoeuvre dans la détermination des taux d’intérêt en fonction des conditions économiques domestiques. Cependant, pour les Banques centrales, des interrogations ont commencé à émerger au sujet de l’efficacité de leurs politiques monétaires ou encore sur le degré de leurs retentissements sur l’économie réelle notamment via le desserrement des contraintes financières. En effet, comment pourraient-elles, de manière indirecte, continuer à orienter la sphère financière et corriger ainsi les déséquilibres qui apparaissent dans le secteur réel ?

Sur le plan des finances publiques, la littérature économique reconnait l’influence des contraintes de financement sur le comportement de la politique budgétaire. Les difficultés d’accès des PED notamment en Afrique au financement (endettement, fiscalité arriérés et APD) contraint ces derniers à pratiquer des politiques pro-cycliques alors que l’allègement des contraintes de financement encouragent ces pays à pratiquer des politiques contra cycliques. Autrement dit, l’impossibilité pour les économies africaines7 de mobiliser suffisamment de ressources financières à même de financer les exigences du développement économique et social se traduit par la mise en oeuvre des politiques budgétaires pro-cycliques.

S’agissant des contraintes intérieures de financement, la faible mobilisation des financements sur le marché des capitaux explique également la mise en oeuvre de politiques budgétaires pro-cycliques9. Pour mettre en évidence une telle relation, il suffit de se référer aux études consacrées à l’aide publique au développement10.
C’est selon ce contexte que, l’OCP Policy Center (OCPPC) et le Laboratoire d’Economie Appliquée de l’Université Mohammed V Rabat, appellent à la soumission d’articles qui explorent les problématiques qui s’inscrivent dans les axes de recherche abordés. La liste ci-dessous qui reste non exhaustive, reprend les principales thématiques pouvant faire l’objet de communication :

- Libéralisation financière peut-elle augmenter ou réduire l’épargne ?
- Réformes bancaires et financement de l’économie
- Rôle du marché de capitaux dans le financement de l’économie
- Les enjeux de la libéralisation des comptes de capital dans les économies africaines.
- Les marges de manoeuvre de la politique monétaire et le régime de change. Le rôle des restrictions sur le compte de capital
- Libéralisation du compte capital et mobilisation de l’épargne
- Volatilité des capitaux et discipline macroéconomique.
- Règle monétaire et transmission de la politique monétaire
- L’aide publique au développement et cyclicité budgétaire
- Le financement du déficit et cyclicité budgétaire
- Dominance fiscale
- La mobilisation des recettes fiscales et cyclicité budgétaire
- Régime de change et cyclicité budgétaire
- Les règles budgétaires

Soumission des contributions :

Les propositions préliminaires de communication doivent contenir :

- Le nom, prénom, institution de rattachement, adresse courriel des auteurs

- Les résultats analytiques et empiriques quasi-finalisées, les méthodes et approches utilisées, ainsi que les interprétations et principales conclusions.

- Les soumissions de papiers peuvent être en français ou en anglais.

- Ces premières propositions devront être envoyées avant le 31 aout 2017, aux adresses suivantes : Abdelaaziz.aitali@ocppc.ma et sadtounsi@gmail.com. - Les auteurs des propositions retenues par le comité scientifique seront avisés le 20 septembre pour finaliser les documents et les présentations PPT.

- Les papiers doivent être des travaux de recherche qui n’ont pas fait objet de présentation ou de publication antérieures.

- Les auteurs des papiers retenus pour publication recevront un prix de 7000 dirhams par papier.

Calendrier :

- 31 Aout 2017 : Date limite d’envoi des propositions préliminaires de communication

- 20 septembre 2017 : avis du comité et notification des auteurs

- 20 Octobre 2017 : date limite d’envoi des versions complètes des documents ainsi que des présentations PPT.

- 8 Novembre 2017 : Tenue de la conférence pour la présentation des travaux retenus dans les locaux d’OCP Policy Center à Rabat.

- 30 November 2017 : date limite d’envoi des versions publiables et mises en forme des communications.

- Janvier 2017 : publication des actes du séminaire

Comité scientifique :

- AIT ALI Abdelaaziz, Economiste, OCP Policy Center.

- BOUSLHAMI Ahmed, Professeur de Sciences Economiques - Faculté des Sciences Juridiques, Economiques et Sociales - Université Abdelmalek Essaâdi – Tanger

- EL ABBASSI Idriss, Professeur de Sciences Economiques - Faculté des Sciences Juridiques, Economiques et Sociales - Université Mohammed V de Rabat

- JAIDI Larabi, Expert en Politique Economique et Economie Internationale, Fellow au OCP Policy Center.

- MARRAT Amine, Economiste en Chef, Attijariwafa Bank.

- OULHAJ Lahcen, Professeur de Sciences Economiques - Faculté des Sciences Juridiques, Economiques et Sociales - Université Mohammed V de Rabat

- RAGBI Aziz, Professeur de Sciences Economiques - Faculté des Sciences Juridiques, Economiques et Sociales - Université Mohammed V de Rabat

- TOUNSI Said, Professeur de Sciences Economiques - Faculté des Sciences Juridiques, Economiques et Sociales - Université Mohammed V de Rabat

 

Télécharger Version Française

Download English Version

Keep me informed
Add to Calendar 14/02/2017 15:30 14/02/2017 15:30 Africa/Casablanca Equilibres Externes, Compétitivité et Processus de Transformation Structurelle de l’Economie Marocaine  Administration des Douanes et Impôts Indirects, Rabat  L’Administration des Douanes et Impôts Indirects, le Laboratoire d’Economie Appliquée de la faculté des sciences juridiques, économiques et sociales de Rabat-Agdal, la Commission économique pour l'Afrique des Nations Unies et OCP Policy Center organisent le 14 février, de 15h30 à 18h30 dans les locaux de l’Administration des... Administration des Douanes et Impôts Indirects, Rabat OCP Policy Center contact@ocppc.ma false DD/MM/YYYY

Equilibres Externes, Compétitivité et Processus de Transformation Structurelle de l’Economie Marocaine

 Administration des Douanes et Impôts Indirects, Rabat 

L’Administration des Douanes et Impôts Indirects, le Laboratoire d’Economie Appliquée de la faculté des sciences juridiques, économiques et sociales de Rabat-Agdal, la Commission économique pour l'Afrique des Nations Unies et OCP Policy Center organisent le 14 février, de 15h30 à 18h30 dans les locaux de l’Administration des Douanes et Impôts Indirects à Rabat, un séminaire pour présenter l’ouvrage intitulé «Equilibres Externes, Compétitivité et Processus de Transformation Structurelle de l’Economie Marocaine».

Cet ouvrage se propose d’apporter quelques éléments d’appui supplémentaires aux policy-makers pour une meilleure identification des défaillances des marchés au Maroc et une mise en place d’une stratégie de diversification et une politique industrielle efficientes, sans toutefois tomber dans la situation inverse où une stratégie mal définie et des outils mal choisis peuvent se traduire par une défaillance des politiques publiques.

pour répondre à ces questionnements, ce livre regroupe les meilleurs articles de recherche qui ont été sélectionnés suite à un appel à communication, lancé en début de l’année 2016, et, présentés lors d’un colloque organisé le 25 Mai 2016 dernier dans les locaux d'OCP Policy Center à Rabat. L’appréhension des difficultés qu’éprouve l’économie marocaine est approchée dans ces articles par l’examen d’une multitude de facteurs, notamment, l’insuffisance du dynamisme des exportations et la faible sophistication du secteur industriel, des IDE avec de faibles effets d’entrainement sur les capacités nationales, en plus de certains aspects liés à la relation entre la politique macroéconomique et la compétitivité, en particulier la politique de change.

Le séminaire se déroulera selon le programme préliminaire suivant :

AGENDA 

 

15:30 –    15:50  Réception  
15:50 – 16:45

Ouverture

 

Zouhair CHORFI, Directeur Général - Administration des Douanes et Impôts Indirects 

Saîd AMZAZI, Président - Université Mohammed V de Rabat

Lahcen OULHAJ – Responsable du Laboratoire d’Economie Appliquée de la Faculté des Sciences Juridiques, Economiques et Sociales (FSJES/LEA) Rabat – Agdal

16:50 – 17:30 

Présentation du livre : Equilibres externes, compétitivité et processus de transformationstructurelle de l’économie Marocaine

modérateur : Idriss EL ABBASSI, Enseignant chercheur en économie, FSJES/LEA Agdal – Université Mohammed V de Rabat

 

Partie 1 : Commerce extérieur et transformation structurelle de l’économie marocaine

Abdellatif CHATRI, Enseignant chercheur en économie, FSJES/LEA Agdal - Université Mohammed V de Rabat

 

Partie 2 : Effets des IDE sur les structures de l’économie marocaine

Sara LABRAR, Doctorante en économie, FSJES/LEA Agdal – Université Mohammed V de Rabat

 

Partie 3 : Désalignement du taux de change et compétitivité

Radouane BACHAR, Enseignant chercheur en économie, FSJES/LEA Agdal– Université Mohammed V de Rabat

17:30 – 18:00  Débat public
18:00 

Clôture

Tayeb GHAZI, Research assistant, OCP Policy Center 

 

Keep me informed
Add to Calendar 10/07/2017 14:00 11/07/2017 17:30 Africa/Casablanca African Peace and Security Annual Conference - APSACO .... African Union: What are the Possible Options for Strategic Autonomy ? OCP Policy Center, Rabat The African Union (AU), since its creation, has taken a predominant and active role in matters related to the continent. It therefore took an active stance in the definition of the economic and political destiny of African nations. To enable it to play such a preponderant role, the... OCP Policy Center, Rabat OCP Policy Center contact@ocppc.ma false DD/MM/YYYY

African Peace and Security Annual Conference - APSACO

African Union: What are the Possible Options for Strategic Autonomy ?

OCP Policy Center, Rabat

The African Union (AU), since its creation, has taken a predominant and active role in matters related to the continent. It therefore took an active stance in the definition of the economic and political destiny of African nations. To enable it to play such a preponderant role, the Union can count on an original institutional framework, an African Peace and Security Architecture (APSA) and a secretariat (commission) which serves as a boosting coordination body for the various common policies of member states. This institutional metamorphosis, makes perfect sense when analysed in the context of the desire to increase the strategic resilience, the pre-eminence of the African Union and sub-regional organizations, the setup of continental free trade zones, the priority that is given to the south-south cooperation and to triangular cooperation and the institutionalization of international partnerships in the unique diplomatic agenda of the African Union. 

However, while this dynamic is legitimate, it is facing several obstacles such as the old antagonism between federalists and moderate-sovereignists, the lack of financial resources, the internal leadership battles, the dependence on international actors to manage crisis and deal with asymmetric security threats and the dogmatic nature of the founding legal principals of the international African order (i.e. issues of sovereignty, inviolability of borders, respect of independence, principle of people’s self-determination). These principles were set during a particular context of independence and, therefore, might not necessarily be adapted to the current world dynamic, Hence, a critical assessment of the African Union’s structure, purpose and mission is quintessential to identify the main weaknesses, and defines alternative courses of action needed to fortify the organization and adapt it to a globally changing and challenging landscape. The recent report of president Paul Kagame “The Imperative to Strengthen our Union” can be a good start in this regard as it offers some valuable ideas that could stimulate the discussion and help move things forward.

This conference aims to offer such platform of discussion to analyse of the African Union based on the notion of strategic autonomy. This notion is at the heart of the discussions given its importance as a concept and a vector. As a concept, and in the light of the current world dynamic, the notion of strategic autonomy is taking a central stage in the discussions of modern strategic doctrines, particularly in developed countries. In the European Union, the discussion of this notion is still at an early “work in progress” stage. However, in the African context, we observe an absence of such discussion of the concept of strategic autonomy an urgent need to start such debate among all AU member states. The reason for the urgency is that AU strategic autonomy could be real vector for the institution’s positioning in the international scene. It shall therefore serve as a guiding principle. Yet, while anchoring such mindset, the specificities of the continent must be taken into consideration. In this regard, four strategic elements much be taken into consideration and tackled, namely: the weak military interoperability, geopolitical paradoxes (i.e. vulnerability and leadership crisis), economic dependence and diplomatic incoherence. 

The conference will aim to shade light on these issues in order to come up with potential ways to move forward with the notion of strategic autonomy in the context of Africa from a theoretical and practical standpoint.

The African Peace and Security Annual Conference will be broken down into five panels:

PANEL I: Thinking the Autonomy of the African Union in a Changing World

PANEL II: Practices of the African Union

PANEL III: Rethinking the African Economic Development Model

PANEL IV: Collective Security

PANEL V: Policy Panel

 

Agenda

 

Monday July 10th 2017

14:00 – 14:15

Registration

14:15 – 14:25

OPENING REMARKS

14:25 – 14:45

INTRODUCTORY AFTERNOON SESSION

Format: Keynote Speech

14:45 – 16:00

PANEL I: THINKING THE AUTONOMY OF THE AFRICAN UNION IN A CHANGING WORLD

The modern strategic doctrine that redefines the notion of “Strategic Autonomy”, in the light of the current world dynamic, is subject to a large debate to which the African institutions must take part. While such philosophy is well established among super powers, it remains under construction in the EU and almost absent in the conceptual framework of African institutions. 

Key Points: 

• Trends of the African strategic debate: consistency and feasibility of Strategic Autonomy
• The relationship between the African Union and the international actors: Dependence vs. Independence
• Lessons from the European Union’s experience.

Format: Presentations followed by Discussion/Q&A

16:00 – 16:15

Coffee Break

16:15 – 17:30

PANEL II: PRACTICES OF THE AFRICAN UNION

The current African governance framework is characterized by institutional dysfunctions, financial dependence on international donors, problems in the implementation of key sectorial projects and public distrust. This session will explore African Union reforms’ feasibility, in the light of the report of president Paul Kagame “The Imperative to Strengthen our Union”. 

Key Points: 

• The institutional framework of the African Union
• An assessment of key African programs (i.e. Agenda 2063, NEPAD, the African Mining vision) 
• African Union reform proposals 

Format: Presentations followed by Discussion/Q&A

Tuesday July 11th 2017

10:00 – 10:20

INTRODUCTORY MORNING SESSION

Format: Keynote Speech

10:20 – 11:45

PANEL III: RETHINKING THE AFRICAN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT MODEL

The debate around the future economic development of Africa is of an extreme importance given the significant impact of the continent on the global economic outlook. Certain countries are already engaged in a process of modernisation of their economies through a greater diversification of fiscal revenues, the need of creating more value, the urge for more regional and sub regional integration and the importance of reducing dependence on commodities’ revenues to avoid a resource curse. This session will explore the endogenous factors that can serve the economic development of the continent. 

Key Points: 

• Structural transformation of African economies 
• Regional and sub-regional integration 
• The pros and cons of free trade

Format: Presentations followed by Discussion/Q&A

14:00 – 14:20

INTRODUCTORY AFTERNOON SESSION

Format: Keynote Speech

14:20 – 15:50

PANEL IV: COLLECTIVE SECURITY

The autonomous management of the collective security of Africa is a key objective of the African Union. This is why the African Peace and Security Architecture (APSA) has been put in place by AU member states. However, this mechanism suffers from the political divergences, the lack of financial resources and the lack of military interoperability. In this context, how can these impediments be addressed to increase the AU’s capacity to manage conflicts and tackle the increasing asymmetric risks? 

Key Points: 

• The reform of the African Peace and Security Architecture (APSA)
• The African reactivity and responsiveness to crises
• The cooperation with international partners (i.e. the European Union) 
• Peace Keeping Operations in Africa

Format: Presentations followed by Discussion/Q&A

15:50 – 16:00

Coffee Break

16:00 – 17:15

POLICY PANEL

Policymakers and experts will build on their insight and the conclusions of the discussions to assess the possible future scenarios of the AU and identify the potential ways forward. 

Format: Presentations followed by Discussion/Q&A

17:15 – 17:30

CLOSING REMARKS

Keep me informed
Add to Calendar 04/04/2017 08:45 04/04/2017 18:00 Africa/Casablanca EU - Africa Strategic Dialogue Rabat, Morocco The EU-Africa Strategic Dialogue is an international conference co-organized by the European Union Institute For Security Studies and the OCP Policy Center, in cooperation with Compagnia di San Paolo, in the context of the “African Futures” project. The objective is to explore possible African trends and scenarios with a horizon of 10 to 15 years, i.e. the end of t... Sofitel Jardin des Roses, Rabat OCP Policy Center contact@ocppc.ma false DD/MM/YYYY

EU - Africa Strategic Dialogue

Rabat, Morocco

The EU-Africa Strategic Dialogue is an international conference co-organized by the European Union Institute For Security Studies and the OCP Policy Center, in cooperation with Compagnia di San Paolo, in the context of the “African Futures” project. The objective is to explore possible African trends and scenarios with a horizon of 10 to 15 years, i.e. the end of the next decade, focusing on what is likely to happen in terms of demography, economy and society, governance, international relations and security – and how all this is expected to affect Europe. 30 countries, 40 international institutions and 40 Moroccan organisations will be represented in the EU-Africa Strategic Dialogue. 80 Experts from both continents will share, during the conference, their respective views on a large array of issues of common interest.

Since Africa is a macro-region encompassing numerous countries and people, with a high degree of internal diversity, a special emphasis will be put on ‘horizontal’ issues such as mobility and resources and their impact on regional development, stability and security. Additionally, given the sheer size of the continent and the number of countries, a particular attention will be paid to sub-regional aspects, trying to analyse key players (states as well as organizations), external influences and vectors (e.g. South Atlantic, Indo-Pacific), as well as drivers of conflict and cooperation.

The aim is to enrich the policy-oriented dialogue, on which the “African Futures” initiative is based, with the voice from a country that sees itself very much as a ‘bridge’ between the two continents and the southern perspective provided by different African stakeholders. This, in turn, is quintessential to uncover a number of megatrends and a spectrum of possible game-changers and to gain a broader understanding of the crucial issues that will influence both continents’ future.

The European Union Institute For Security Studies - OCPPC conference will be broken down into five panels:

Panel I: Opening Panel

Panel II: Economic Development Prospects

Panel III: The Fight Against Terrorism and Transnational Crimes

Panel IV: The Future of Populations and Cities

Panel V: Africa’s Powers

Panel VI: Policy Panel

Agenda

 
08:45 – 09:00

Registration

09:00 – 09:10

Opening Remarks

Antonio Missiroli (Director, European Union Institute For Security Studies) - EU  

Karim El Aynaoui (Managing Director, OCP Policy Center) – Morocco 

09: 10 – 09: 40

Introductory Session

This session will enrich the EU-Africa Strategic Dialogue Conference with the insight of policy makers. It will be the occasion for them to pinpoint critical issues that are topping the policy-making agenda. It will also be an opportunity to share views and bring ideas that can be debated during the rest of conference.  

Youssef Amrani (Head of Mission, Royal Cabinet) – Morocco

Raul de Luzenberger (Interim Head of the European Union Delegation in Morocco) – EU

Chair:

Mohamed Loulichki (Senior Fellow, OCP Policy Center) – Morocco

Format: Keynote Speaches

09: 40 – 10: 55

Panel I: Economic Development Prospects

The future economic development of Africa is of the utmost importance as it will significantly impact the global outlook. That is why this panel will focus on industrialization, trade and regional integration. I will also highlight issues related to the modernisation of agriculture and the optimisation of land usage. Lasty, given the continent’s enormous natural resources reserves, a special attention will be given to the extraction of these resources, the management of their revenues and the possible ways of dealing with the potential impacts of climate change.  

Mourad Ezzine (Manager, the Center for Mediterranean Integration) – France

Morten Jerven (Professor, Norwegian University of Life Sciences) – Norway

Natznet Tesfay (Director of Africa Analysis, IHS Markit) – UK

Festus M. Lansana (Senior Researcher, Center for Economic Research and Capacity Building) – Sierra Leone

Chair:   

Moubarack Lo (Advisor and Chief Economist, Office of the Prime Minister of Senegal, Senior Visiting Fellow, OCP Policy Center) - Senegal

Presentations followed by Discussion/Q&A 

10: 55 – 11: 10

Coffee Break

11: 10 – 12: 25

Panel II: The future of Populations and Cities 

The growth of cities and the demographic shifts are key elements that affect countries’ development. Therefore, this panel will shed light on the projected demographic trends to understand the potential structures of future societies. The panel witll also address the growing urbanisation and its impacts on employment and safety. Last but not least, given the historical human movements between Africa and Europe and the increasing number of conflict zones, migration and displacement will be discussed to identify possible ways of dealing with such issues.

Julia Bello-Schünemann (Senior Research Consultant, ISS) – South Africa

Alex Vines (Research Director,Chatham House) – UK

Franklin Cudjoe (Founding President at IMANI Center for Policy & Education) - Ghana

Eckart Woertz (Researcher, Barcelona Center for International Affairs (CIDOB)) - Spain

Chair:

Nicolo Russo Perez (Coordinator of International Affairs, Compagnia di San Paolo) – Italy

Format: Presentations followed by Discussion/Q&A 

12: 25 – 13: 55

Lunch Break

 14: 00 – 15: 15

Panel III: The Fight Against Terrorism and Transnational Crimes 

Instability and the growing transnational threats are at the heart of recent poliymakers discussions. In effect, turmoils in several regions are expected to bring additional global challenges. This panel will try to discuss some of the most disturbing questions in this regard. It will start with a closer look at terrorism and jihadism. A particular attention witll then be given to organized crimes and the movements of arms and drugs. Lastly, human trafficking will be discussed to understand the issue and its broad implications.

Abdelhak Bassou (Senior Fellow, OCP Policy Center) – Morocco

Mehdi Taje (Directeur du Département des Politiques Publiques, Etudes Stratégiques et prospectives Institut Tunisien des Études Stratégiques (ITES)) – Tunisia

Amani El Taweel (Senior Fellow, Al-Ahram Centre for Political & Strategic Studies) – Egypt

Mohamed Salem Boukhreiss (Coordinator, EU-Maurtania Cooperation) – Mauritania

Rida Lyammouri (Sahel Analyst, Independent Consultant) - USA

Chair:

Francesco Strazzari (Associate Analyst, EUISS) - EU

Format: Presentations followed by Discussion/Q&A 

15: 15 – 16: 30

Panel IV: Africa’s Powers

This panel will explore current geopolitical trends and the complex dynamics that drive the strategic choices and actions of western superpowers. It will also analyse the moving balance of power in Africa. A particular consideration will be given to the growing role, in the continent, of some emerging countries, namely: China, India and Brazil. Lastly, the panelists will identify the continent’s emerging powers and their future role in the international agenda.  

Kirstin De Peyron (Head of Division, Pan-African Affairs, European External Action Service (EEAS)) – EU

D. Elwood Dunn (Senior Fellow, Center for Policy Studies) – Liberia

Jalal Abdel-latif (Head, Governance & Human Security Cluster, UNECA; Senior Fellow, OCP Policy Center) – Ethiopia

Ashraf Swelam (Director, Cairo Center for Conflict Resolution) – Egypt

Chair:

Valerie Arnould (Senior Research Fellow, Egmont Institute) - Belgium 

Format: Presentations followed by Discussion/Q&A 

16: 30 – 16: 45 Coffee Break
16: 45 – 18: 00

Policy Panel 

Policymakers and experts will build on their insight and the conclusions of the discussions to assess the possible scenarios and identify Africa’s Megatrends for the next 10 to 15 years.  

Monika Sie Dhian Ho MA (General Director, The Clingendael Institute) – Netherlands 

Nguyen Manh Hung (Director General, The Institute for Africa and Middle East Studies (IAMES)) - Vietnam

Elisabeth Pape (Acting Head of Unit, Fragility and Resilience, DG DEVCO, European Commission) – EU

Kidane Kiros (Director, Institute for Peace & Security Studies (IPSS)) – Ethiopia

Chair:

Jean-Baptiste Jeangène Vilmer (Director, IRSEM) – France

Format: Presentations followed by Discussion/Q&A

18: 00 – 18: 10 Closing Remarks

 

About the European Union Institute for Security Studies

The EUISS is an autonomous EU agency that works under the aegis of the High Representative (HR) Federica Mogherini, in close cooperation with the European External Action Service (EEAS) and under the supervision of the Political and Security Committee (PSC). It has its Headquarters in Paris and a liaison office in Brussels, where most of its activities now take place. It organizes workshops and conferences, publishes long and short papers, and participates in a number of networking activities inside and outside the EU.

EUISS’s website

About OCP Policy Center

The OCP Policy Center is a Moroccan policy-oriented think tank based in Rabat, Morocco, striving to promote knowledge sharing and to contribute to an enriched reflection on key economic and international relations issues. By offering a southern perspective on major regional and global strategic challenges facing developing and emerging countries, the OCP Policy Center aims to provide a meaningful policy-making contribution through its four research programs: Agriculture, Environment and Food Security, Economic and Social Development, Commodity Economics and Finance, Geopolitics and International Relations.

Keep me informed
Add to Calendar 26/01/2017 17:30 26/01/2017 19:00 Africa/Casablanca Why are think tanks more important now than ever before? OCP Policy Center, Rabat Building up on last years’ Global Go To Think Tank launch event OCP Policy Center in partnership with the Lauder Institute will be holding an event about “Why are think tanks more important now than ever before?”.  OCP Policy Center, Rabat OCP Policy Center contact@ocppc.ma false DD/MM/YYYY

Why are think tanks more important now than ever before?

OCP Policy Center, Rabat

Building up on last years’ Global Go To Think Tank launch event OCP Policy Center in partnership with the Lauder Institute will be holding an event about “Why are think tanks more important now than ever before?”. 

This event is being organized in conjunction with the release of the 2016 Global Go To Think Tank Index Report, and will simultaneously be taking place in other cities to establish global networks of think tank communities in order to improve policy making around the world.

The Global Go To Think Tank Index is the result of an international survey of over 1,950 scholars, public and private donors, policy makers, and journalists who helped rank more than 6,500 think tanks using a set of 18 criteria developed by The Think Tanks and Civil Societies Program (TTCSP). The purpose of the index is to help improve the profile and performance of think tanks while highlighting the important work they do for governments and civil societies around the world.

Agenda

 

17:30 – 17:45

Opening Remarks

17:45 – 19:00

SESSION 1: The Role of Think Tanks in Promoting Global Responses to Global Threats.   

Moderator: Abdallah Saaf, Director of the Center for Studies in Social Sciences Research (CERSS) and OCPPC Senior Fellow.

First Global Threat: Protectionism:
• Younes Sekkouri: PDG et Fondateur, Consulting & Design Thinking.  

Second global threat: Climate change: 
• Mohamed Nbou: Director of Climate change, Ministry of Environment. 

Third global threat: Populism and extremism: 
• Fatima Harrak: Ex Director of CODESRIA and Member of African Studies Institute. 

19:00

Closing Remarks

Keep me informed
Add to Calendar 06/01/2017 15:15 06/01/2017 15:15 Africa/Casablanca event debrief hide Not specified OCP Policy Center contact@ocppc.ma false DD/MM/YYYY

event debrief hide

Keep me informed
Add to Calendar 05/01/2017 17:30 05/01/2017 19:00 Africa/Casablanca Fiscal stabilization: Determinants and Effects OCP Policy Center is pleased to receive Dr. Davide Furceri, senior economist at the IMF Research Department on Thursday 5th January at 5:30 pm in the OCP Policy Center office in Rabat. He will give a talk on the fiscal stabilization, determinants and effects. OCP Policy Center, Rabat OCP Policy Center contact@ocppc.ma false DD/MM/YYYY

Fiscal stabilization: Determinants and Effects

OCP Policy Center is pleased to receive Dr. Davide Furceri, senior economist at the IMF Research Department on Thursday 5th January at 5:30 pm in the OCP Policy Center office in Rabat. He will give a talk on the fiscal stabilization, determinants and effects.

The presentation focuses on how fiscal stabilization has changed over time in advanced and emerging market economies. It discusses the determinants of fiscal stabilization, and the role of fiscal stabilization in reducing macroeconomic volatility and boosting productivity-enhancing long-term investment.

Keep me informed
About the Speaker :
  • Davide Furceri

    Davide Furceri is a senior economist at the IMF Research Department. He holds a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Illinois. He previously worked as an economist at the Fiscal Policy Division of the European Central Bank, and at the Macroeconomic Analysis Division of the OECD Economics Department. He has published extensively in leading academic and policy-oriented journals on a wide range of topics in the area of macroeconomics, public finance and international macroeconomics.

Add to Calendar 19/12/2016 09:00 20/12/2016 18:45 Africa/Casablanca Conférence Internationale Conjointe sur la Coopération Afro-Asiatique Université Mohammed V, Rabat OCP Policy Center, en collaboration avec l’Université Mohamed V de Rabat, l’Institut des Etudes Africaines de l’Université de Nanjing (Chine), l’Institut des Etudes Euro-Africaines de l’Université de Hanyang (Corée du Sud) et l’Institut Maiji des Etudes Globales de l’Université de Meiji (Japon), l’Institut Confucius à Rabat, et le Centre Africain des ... Université Mohammed V, Rabat OCP Policy Center contact@ocppc.ma false DD/MM/YYYY

Conférence Internationale Conjointe sur la Coopération Afro-Asiatique

Université Mohammed V, Rabat

OCP Policy Center, en collaboration avec l’Université Mohamed V de Rabat, l’Institut des Etudes Africaines de l’Université de Nanjing (Chine), l’Institut des Etudes Euro-Africaines de l’Université de Hanyang (Corée du Sud) et l’Institut Maiji des Etudes Globales de l’Université de Meiji (Japon), l’Institut Confucius à Rabat, et le Centre Africain des Etudes Asiatiques, organisent la 1ère édition de la conférence internationale conjointe sur la coopération afro-asiatique, qui se tiendra le 19 et 20 décembre 2016 à l’Université Mohamed V de Rabat.

Cette conférence se veut un terrain de rencontre entre les responsables gouvernementaux œuvrant dans différents domaines, les universitaires, les académiciens et les membres de la société civile de l’Afrique et de l’Asie qui s’intéressent à la problématique de la coopération afro-asiatique en général et à la présence asiatique en Afrique sous plusieurs formes, culturelle, politique et économique.

Cette rencontre permettra pareillement de débattre davantage et mettre en exergue les différentes dispositions de la politique étrangère du Royaume du Maroc, caractérisée à la fois par la diversité des horizons et la multiplicité des partenaires.

Il va sans dire que les moments, dont le continent africain persiste, a le mérite d’interpeler chacun de nous et s’avèrent souvent des moments qui marquent l’histoire de l’humanité et des populations. Ils constituent, en effet, 
un facteur de regroupement autour duquel des idées et des propositions 
sont discutées en vue de réduire la marge des effets négatifs des ambiguïtés et en tirer les leçons pour un avenir basé sur le principe de Gagnant-Gagnant.

La conférence se déroulera autour des axes suivants : 

- Les nouvelles tendances de la coopération des forums afro-asiatiques et les ODD (Objectifs de développement durable);
- L’économie bleue / maritime, sécurité alimentaire et opportunités de la coopération afro-asiatique ;
- La Géopolitique de la Coopération afro-asiatique dans un environnement mondial en mutation ; 
- La Dimension culturelle dans la coopération afro-asiatique.

L’impact réel et potentiel de la présence asiatique en Afrique sur les termes d’une coopération équilibrée sera débattu lors de cette importante réunion. Plusieurs experts Japonais, Chinois, Coréens et Africains sont conviés pour débattre les retombées de la présence asiatique en Afrique, évaluer les éventuels conséquences sur la coopération Afrique-Asie en général et échanger les réflexions sur les moyens à mettre en œuvre en vue de faire de la coopération afro-asiatique un mécanisme pour le développement des territoires et la prospérité des peuples.

Agenda

 

Lundi 19 décembre 

09 :00 - 10 :30

Session d’ouverture

- Pr. Saaid Amzazi, Président de l’Université Mohammed V de Rabat, Maroc
- S.E. M. Nacer Bourita, Ministre Délégué auprès du Ministre des Affaires étrangères et de la Coopération, Maroc
- S.E M. SUN Shuzhong, Ambassadeur de la République Populaire de la Chine au Maroc
- S.E M.Tsuneo Kurokawa, Ambassadeur du Japon au Maroc
- S.E M. Dongsil Park, Ambassadeur de la République de la Corée au Maroc
- S.E Mme. Kheya Bhattacharya, Ambassadeur de l’Inde au Maroc
- Comité d’organisation

10:30 - 10:45

Cérémonie de signature du protocole d'entente (MOU) entre l'U.M.5 de Rabat et les partenaires asiatiques

Photo mémorative collective

10:45 - 11:00

Pause-café

11:00 - 12:45

Plénière Spéciale

Modérateur : Dr. Karim El Aynaoui, Directeur Général de l’OCP Policy Center

- M. Philippe Poinsot, Représentant-Résident du PNEUD au Maroc
- M. Kang Xiaolong, Représentant-Résident de la Banque de la Chine à Casablanca
- M. Hitoshi Tojima, Représentant-Résident de la JICA au Maroc
- Youseung Shin, Représentant-Résident de la KOICA au Maroc
- M. Mohamed Methqal, Ambassadeur et Directeur Général de l’AMCI

Débat

12:45 - 15:00

Déjeuner

15:00 - 16:15

Troisième Plénière

Modérateur : Miloud Loukili, Professeur de Droit International à l’UM5 à Rabat

- Mme. Hadia Laraki, Directrice Générale de l’Agence Nationale des Ports

Marine economy Strategy: China and Africa

- Zhenke Zhang, CASNJU

Intervention 2

- Karim Hilmi, Professeur à L’ Institut National de Recherche Halieutique

Intervention 3

- Mme Yacine Fal, Représentante-Résidente de la Banque Africaine de Développement au Maroc

16:15 - 16:30

Pause café

16:30 - 18:30

The African Atlantic as a Potential Dynamism

Rachid El Houdaigui, Professeur des Relations Internationales à l’Université Abdelmalek Saadi, Tanger & Senior fellow à l’OCP Policy Center

Impacts of China and Africa land policy changes on food security

Xianjin Huang, Vice-Doyen de l’Ecole de la Géographie et de l’Océanographie à l’Université de Nanjing

Intervention 3

Moubarak Lo , Président de l'Institut Emergence & Senior fellow à l’OCP Policy Center

Soil erosion and soil conservation in Asia, case study from Japan and China

Xingqi Zhang, Professeur au Centre des Etudes Africaines à l’Université de Nanjing

Trends of Food Security management in China

Ruina Su, Chercheur au Centre des Etudes Africaines à l’Université de Nanjing

L’Afrique du Nord face aux menaces Terroristes : le Cas de la Libye

El Moussaoui Al-Ajlaoui, Professeur des Affaires Africaines à l’Institut des Etudes Africaines à l’Université Mohammed V

Débat

Mardi 20 décembre

09:00 - 10:45

Quatrième Plénière

Modérateur : Zakaria Abou Dahab, Vice-Doyen de la Faculté des Sciences Juridiques, Economiques et Sociales-Agdal, à l’Université Mohammed V de Rabat

Economic Development of Africa and Establishing Governance

Sungsoo Kim, Directeur de l’Institut des Etudes Euro-Africaines à l’Université de Hanyang

Le partenariat trilatéral entre la Chine, la France et l’ Afrique

Chengfu Liu, Professeur à l’Ecole des Etudes Etrangères à l’Université de Nanjing.

Comparative study on China-French-African economic relations

Tao You, Professeur à l’Institut des Etudes Européennes. L’Académie Chinoise des Sciences Sociales

An overview on the new dynamism of Moroccan African Policy

Khalid Chegraoui, Professeur des Affaires Africaines à l’Institut des études Africaines à l’Université Mohammed V

Sino-Kenya Relations under the Perspective of the Belt and Road Initiative: The Selection of a Strategic Economic Fulcrum

Litao Liu, CASNJU

Moroccan African Policy and its implication on continental integration (Provisoire)

Mohammed Jari, Professeur des Relations Internationales à l’I.E.A, UM5 de Rabat

Japan's Africa policy: New orientations

Adil Moussaoui, Professeur des Relations Internationales à l’Université Mohammed V

10:45 - 11:00

Pause café

11:00 - 12:30

"Do the EU build the Fortress against Africa? Immigration Policies of the EU, France, and Germany"

Sungeun Shim, Professeur à l’Institut des Etudes Euro-Africaines , Université de Hanyang

La Chine face à la prolifération du phénomène terroriste en Afrique

Abdelhak Bassou, Senior Fellow à l’ OCP Policy Center

Africain des Etudes Asiatiques Les nouvelles configurations du Djihadisme post-retour : le phénomène des combattants étrangers

El Mostafa Rezrazi, Professeur de la Gestion des Crises à SGU et Directeur du Centre Africain des études Asiatiques 

Moroccan Mixed Best Strategy in countering Extremism: The Religious Factor combined

Nakagawa Kei, Professeur de Sociologie Politique et chercheur à l’Institut Meiji pour les Affaires Globales à l’Université de Meiji 

Débat

12:30 - 15:00

Déjeuner

15:00 - 16:15

Cinquième Plénière

Modérateur : Jamal Eddine El Hani, Doyen de la F.L.S.H à l’UM5 de Rabat

Réfléchir la Chine Autrement (provisoire)

Fathallah Oualalou, Professeur de l’Economie à l’Université Mohammed V de Rabat, et Senior Fellow à l’OCP Policy Center

Les Perspectives de l'Enseignement de la langue chinoise au Maroc

Karima Yatribi, Directrice de l’Institut Confucius à l’Université Mohammed V

Introduction of Chinese Landscape Painting

Xiaomin Yang, Professeur d’Art au Centre des Etudes Africaines à l’Université de Nanjing

Japanese Renaissance and lessons to learn

Mohammed Aafif, Professeur de l’Histoire à l’Université Mohammed V de Rabat

16:00 - 16:15

Pause Café

16:15 - 18:45

Sixième Séance

Séance spéciale réservée aux étudiants-doctorants

Modérateur : Mustapha Machrafi, Vice-Doyen de la FSJES - Salé, UM5 de Rabat

Les rivalités Sino-Américaines sur l’Afrique

Lahcen el Hasnaoui, Université Hassan II, Casablanca

Economic Sino-Moroccan Cooperation: Trends and Perspectives

Mohammed Illioun, Université Ibn Zohr, Agadir

Industrialization in the region of Maghreb

Weilin Chu , Université de Nanjing

Marine fishery development and fish trade in Vietnam

Hang Ren, Université de Nanjing

China’s rural development experiences based on policies analysis

Qing Wang, Université de Nanjing

Area Studies in Morocco: A survey in research & Teaching

Naouam abdelfatah, Université Mohammed V

Peace regionalization: ECOWAS role in conflict resolution

El Hassan Traouri, Université Mohammed V de Rabat

Débat et clôture

Keep me informed

Pages

Subscribe to FeedRSS Subscribe to BlogRSS Subscribe to PublicationsRSS Subscribe to EventsRSS Subscribe to AllRSS